Sunderbans – at a glance

Where the land meets the sea at the southern     tip of West Bengal lies the Indian Sundarbans, a stretch of impenetrable mangrove forest     of great size and bio-diversity. A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Sundarban is a vast     area covering 4262 square kms in India alone, with a larger portion in Bangladesh. 2585     sq. kms of the Indian Sundarban forms the largest Tiger Reserve and National Park in     India. The total area of the Indian part of the Sundarban forest, lying within the latitude between 21°13’-22°40’ North and longitude 88°05’-89°06’ East, is about 4,262 sq km, of which 2,125 sq km is occupied by mangrove forest across 56 islands and the balance is   under water. 

The Sundarbans are a part of the world’s largest delta formed by the rivers Ganges, Brahmaputra and Meghna. Situated on the lower end of the Gangetic West Bengal, 21°13’-22°40’ North and longitude 88°05’-89°06’ East, it is also the world’s largest estuarine forest. The     Sundarbans is inhospitable, dangerous and monotonous.  Dense mangrove forests occupy 56 islands and the balance is   under saline water which flows through numerous tidal channels and creeks. It is     difficult to approach and even more difficult to spend time in. But for those who dare, it     must be one of the most attractive and alluring places remaining on earth.

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